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Everyone Wants to Be Korean, as the K-wave Sucks in International Talent

Patrick Frater Asia Bureau ChiefSurprising as it may sound, the Korean film industry has had a rough time over the past couple of years. Get ready for a comeback.Just at a moment when Korean film producers might have expected to capitalize on the unprecedented multi-Oscar success of “Parasite” (and the previous year’s Korean-language “Minari,” COVID closed down Korean cinemas , stifled production and extinguished Korean audiences’ willingness to venture into cinemas.

Pre-COVID, South Korea had been the world’s fourth-largest theatrical market, but for two years has been in an abyss.That the Korean film industry has an undiminished capacity for delivering high-quality pictures is amply on display in Cannes, where the country has four starkly different titles: “Decision to Leave,” a meticulous detective mystery from maestro Park Chan-wook; “Broker,” an issues-driven drama made in Korea by Japan’s former Palme d’Or winner Kore-eda Hirokazu; a convoluted 1980s-set spy actioner from “Squid Game” star Lee Jung-jae, making his feature directing debut; and an understated and introspective drama, “Next Sohee,” from Cannes returnee Jung July. But back home, cinema chains have lost vast sums of money over the past two years and  distributors reacted to the new conditions by halting local releases.

Last year’s “Emergency Declaration,” showcased at Cannes, is still unreleased at home and joins a backlog of over 100 completed movies awaiting a release.As a result, Korean films’ market share collapsed to levels not seen for 10 years. Korean films’ gross revenues tumbled from some KRW970 billion ($776 million) in 2019 to just KRW173 billion ($138 million) in 2021.The film industry is now hoping for a trickle-down effect from Korea’s

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Waves: Main News

Patrick Frater Asia Bureau ChiefSurprising as it may sound, the Korean film industry has had a rough time over the past couple of years. Get ready for a comeback.Just at a moment when Korean film producers might have expected to capitalize on the unprecedented multi-Oscar success of “Parasite” (and the previous year’s Korean-language “Minari,” COVID closed down Korean cinemas , stifled production and extinguished Korean audiences’ willingness to venture into cinemas.
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Scientists set up 'alien telescope' to listen to messages sent to Earth from outer space - dailystar.co.uk - state West Virginia
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Scientists set up 'alien telescope' to listen to messages sent to Earth from outer space
Scientists have set up an “alien telescope” that focuses purely on sounds coming to Earth from outer space.Researchers at the National Radio Quiet Zone in West Virginia – one of the quietest places on the planet, where mobile phones don’t work and WiFi is scarce – are hoping to pick up messages from extra-terrestrial beings.A huge receiver that is 100 metres wide and fully steerable turns radio waves from space into electric signals that boffins then analyse.Dr Ethan Siegel, a theoretical astrophysicist working on the project, said aliens could be trying to send us messages from deep space.He told FreeThink: “If someone is actively speaking to us from across the universe, if we didn’t listen because we didn’t find it easily the first time, how much would we be short-changing ourselves through our own short sightedness?“If we discover we're not alone in the universe it will change forever how we view life on earth… (but) the way we’re going to find it is not through grainy footage or pixels we can’t make out.”Although there have been plenty of supposed UFOs caught on camera, researchers can’t find out much from the footage as it is often blurry and could have easily been edited.Stay up to date with all the Daily Star's latest news by signing up to one of our free newsletters here.But the new project to listen to outer space could prove the key to having definitive proof of life outside of planet Earth.Ryan Lynch, a scientist at the Green Bank Observatory, added: “The radio signals we’re trying to pick up from space are extremely weak.“It’s like casting a net – the bigger the receiver dish, the bigger the net and the weaker the signals we can pick up.” It comes as governments around the world start to take UFO sightings
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