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Warning over potential 'nightmare' school run for Perth parents due to roadworks

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Motorists are being warned to expect "significant delays" when essential roadworks in Perth get under way. A Perth City Centre councillor has warned it could be a "nightmare" for parents trying to drop children off at school.

The resurfacing works on Dundee Road are scheduled to start on Tuesday, January 18.Resurfacing works from Kinnoull Primary School to Manse Road - including the Queen's Bridge junction - are expected to take approximately two weeks to complete.Perth and Kinross Council has advised three-way temporary traffic lights will be in place along with a suspension of loading and parking to allow works to be done "safely and efficiently".

A PKC spokesperson said: "The junctions with Riverside and Manse Road will be closed throughout the works, with local diversions in place, to minimise delays when travelling through the works area. "We would therefore advise motorists to expect significant delays and to allow themselves extra time if travelling via this part of the city."The temporary traffic lights will be manually controlled by the traffic management operator between 7am and 7pm to minimise the delays.

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