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Thomas Rhett - Willa Gray - Love I (I) - Thomas Rhett won't tell his six-year-old daughter Willa about her adoption until she's 10 - dailymail.co.uk - USA - Uganda - county Love
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Thomas Rhett won't tell his six-year-old daughter Willa about her adoption until she's 10
Five-time Grammy nominee Thomas Rhett and his wife Lauren Gregory Akins have decided not to tell their six-year-old daughter Willa Gray about her 2017 adoption from Uganda until she turns 10.The 32-year-old country crooner told Hoda Kotb on her Making Space podcast on Monday that Willa already 'has really intense questions all the time' about being the only African-American in an all-Caucasian family.'She talks to Lauren, she's like, "When can we get to see my friends in Uganda?"' Thomas recalled. December 1 family portrait:Five-time Grammy nominee Thomas Rhett and his wife Lauren Gregory Akins have decided not to tell their six-year-old daughter Willa Gray about her 2017 adoption from Uganda until she turns 10 'All the time': The 32-year-old country crooner told Hoda Kotb on her Making Space podcast on Monday that Willa already 'has really intense questions' about being the only African-American in an all-Caucasian family'And then [her four-year-old sister] Ada James will be like, "When can I go see our friends in Uganda?" And Willa Gray will be like, "Well, they're not your friends, they're my friends."'The child is probably aware of her 32-year-old mother's involvement with the Christian nonprofit organization Love One International, which provides life-saving medical care and more to Ugandan families.
AURORA and Max Richter on new season of Savages’ Fay Milton’s climate podcast - nme.com - Britain - Uganda
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AURORA and Max Richter on new season of Savages’ Fay Milton’s climate podcast
AURORA, Max Richter, and more have been announced as guests on Fay Milton’s Sounds Like A Plan podcast, where they’ll discuss how the music world is responding to the climate crisis.The podcast – hosted by the Savages drummer and activist, along with journalist Greg Cochrane – is set to return for its third season today (March 30) and is set to share 10 new episodes of conversations with music and climate change-makers.The series will explore a broad range of topics including, bringing veganism to the live music experience, visiting one of the UK’s only “carbon positive” music recording spaces, the innovative collaborations happening between climate scientists and musicians, and how music can play a role in mainstream climate communication.A post shared by Sounds Like A Plan (@soundslikeaplanpodcast)The podcast also plans to dig into the threat to indigenous people and culture in the regions most severely affected by extreme weather and the links between climate, mental health and songwriting.“It’s easy to get dragged into feeling hopeless about the world, but there are also so many positive and beautiful things coming out of the challenges we face,” Milton said.The music world is full of creative minds and when those minds get turned to environmental and social causes, all manner of wonderful things come out. Each interview has left me with a head full of new ideas.”Other upcoming guests include Nick Mulvey, Ugandan rapper Jaspher Ewany, and climate communication and storytelling specialist, Nicky Hawkins.Milton has been heavily involved in climate activism for some time.
Matt Damon - Review: How to best tackle the global challenge of water - abcnews.go.com - Uganda
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Review: How to best tackle the global challenge of water
“The Worth of Water,” by Gary White and Matt Damon (Penguin Random House)Gary White, the water engineer-activist, and Matt Damon, the actor-philanthropist, have formed one of the world’s great partnerships and solved a problem that has eluded well-meaning institutions, national governments and brainy people — how to bring clean water to millions of poor households.Without that most fundamental of commodities, the poor were trapped in a cycle of poverty, often paying exorbitant prices for delivered water or spending hours daily hauling jugs from distant streams and wells.“People trapped in this cannot escape,” White said.He and Damon created an escape path — water.org and partnerships with banks that allowed people to borrow $275, typically what it cost to connect water to a house in a poor country.In this work, as the book details, the numbers are stunning.— 785 million people in the world lack access to safe water.— 443 million missed school days are caused by waterborne diseases.— 20% of people’s income in some poor countries is spent on buying water from trucks.“It’s expensive to be poor,” the book notes.Thanks to White and Damon’s efforts, that math is changing.— 43 million people have received micro loans to enable water connections to their houses.— 99% of the loans are repaid.— 88% of the loan receivers are women.Water carries an almost magical transformative power. For example, White relates the story of a woman in Uganda who, after she connected water to her house, started making bricks, raising a pig and growing a garden.
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