Woody Allen: Last News

Mindy Kaling - Woody Allen - Liz Phair - Michael R.Jackson - Tori Amos - Voice - Mindy Kaling Pays Tribute to Michael R. Jackson and His ‘Breakthrough Masterpiece’ Broadway Musical ‘A Strange Loop’ - variety.com
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Mindy Kaling Pays Tribute to Michael R. Jackson and His ‘Breakthrough Masterpiece’ Broadway Musical ‘A Strange Loop’
Mindy Kaling Michael R. Jackson is, in a word, dazzling. His Broadway musical, “A Strange Loop,” is a breakthrough masterpiece whose plot I won’t describe here because it’s so inventive that my summary wouldn’t do it justice. But what I can say is that it’s a musical about a writer … well, trying to write. The star of “A Strange Loop” is Usher, a “young overweight-to-obese homosexual and/ or gay and/or queer, cisgender male writer,” as he says in his opening song, working to find his way in the world, deciphering the many destructive (and often extremely funny) voices in his head. Watching Michael’s Pulitzer- and Tony Award-winning musical, I felt like someone had shone a light on the creative process of writing in a way it had never been examined before. For years, many neurotic writers have been able to see themselves in the protagonists of Woody Allen movies or Charlie Kaufman’s “Adaptation” or, hell, even “The Shining.” I never completely got it. But I actually identify with Usher, a funny, tortured, pop-culture-fluent brown man trying to impress his parents, discover his voice, vanquish his shame and have sex occasionally. Michael managed to capture all the moments of artistic self-doubt and relentless self-examination and somehow make it joyful, funny and relatable.
Woody Allen - Steven Spielberg - Peter Debruge - John Ford - ‘The Fabelmans’ Review: Steven Spielberg Takes a Sweet, Heavily Filtered Selfie of His Formative Years - variety.com - USA
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‘The Fabelmans’ Review: Steven Spielberg Takes a Sweet, Heavily Filtered Selfie of His Formative Years
Peter Debruge Chief Film Critic No director has done more to deconstruct the myth of the suburban American family than Steven Spielberg. Dissertations have been written and documentaries made on the subject. And now, at the spry young age of 75, Spielberg himself weighs in on where his preoccupations come from in “The Fabelmans,” a personal account of his upbringing that feels like listening to two and a half hours’ worth of well-polished cocktail-party anecdotes, only better, since he’s gone to the trouble of staging them all for our benefit. Spielberg’s a born storyteller, and these are arguably his most precious stories. From the first movie he saw (“The Greatest Show on Earth”) to memories of meeting filmmaker John Ford on the Paramount lot, this endearing, broadly appealing account of how Spielberg was smitten by the medium — and why the prodigy nearly abandoned picture-making before his career even started — holds the keys to so much of the master’s filmography. More similar to Woody Allen’s autobiographical “Radio Days” than it is to European art films such as “The 400 Blows” and “Amistad” (the more highbrow models other directors typically point to when re-creating their childhoods), “The Fabelmans” invites audiences into the home and headspace of the world’s most beloved living director, an oddly sanitized zone where even the trauma — which includes anti-Semitism, financial disadvantage and divorce — seems to go better with fresh-buttered popcorn.
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