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Jeannie Mai on Why 'The Real' Cancellation Has Been So Hard (Exclusive)

Jeannie Mai is proud of what the award-winning talk show accomplished. In April, it was announced that the daytime program hosted by Mai, Garcelle Beauvais, Adrienne Houghton and Loni Love was canceled — after eight seasons. “It’s hard because the show was the first of its kind. When you have a show that is by minority voices for minority voices, I gotta say, I didn’t have a show like that when I started,” Mai, 43, told ET’s Kevin Frazier.“And even today I’m like, 'Where can I go that has such a great culmination of different aspects and women's perspectives that come from different lives and cultures?' Especially as an Asian woman, I don't see that representation enough.” She continued, “So, for me getting off that show was hard because I still think we need a show like that. So, if we open doors for other shows like that to be in production, I’m excited about that.

I wanna see that happen.” As one of the few Vietnamese American hosts, Mai is proud of the platform and inspiration that provided.  “When people ask me, ‘What’s it like being one of the only Vietnamese Americans in TV?’ it feels lonely,” she shared. “It doesn’t feel great.

I want to open that up more for the AAPI community. At the same time, I’m proud of for what we did. We were iconic.”  And while the ladies of  may no longer be together onscreen, Mai promises it’s not the end of their relationship.

“Absolutely, yeah, the girls, we keep in touch, we have our text thread,” she shared about remaining in contact with her co-hosts. “I think that's the greatest, and from here, like, the girls, they're gonna soar. J-Money, Garcelle, Adrienne, Loni.

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Vietnam: Main News

Jeannie Mai is proud of what the award-winning talk show accomplished. In April, it was announced that the daytime program hosted by Mai, Garcelle Beauvais, Adrienne Houghton and Loni Love was canceled — after eight seasons. “It’s hard because the show was the first of its kind. When you have a show that is by minority voices for minority voices, I gotta say, I didn’t have a show like that when I started,” Mai, 43, told ET’s Kevin Frazier.“And even today I’m like, 'Where can I go that has such a great culmination of different aspects and women's perspectives that come from different lives and cultures?' Especially as an Asian woman, I don't see that representation enough.” She continued, “So, for me getting off that show was hard because I still think we need a show like that. So, if we open doors for other shows like that to be in production, I’m excited about that.
Dan Rather, whose broadcast journalism career has spanned six decades including being anchor of CBS Evening News from 1982-2006, has been given the Peabody Career Achievement Award.

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