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Elsa Keslassy International - Cooper - Ari Folman, Nadav Lapid, Hagai Levi Among 250 Israeli Filmmakers Protesting New Shomron Fund for the ‘Oppression of the Palestinian People’ - variety.com - county Will - Israel - Palestine - area West Bank
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Ari Folman, Nadav Lapid, Hagai Levi Among 250 Israeli Filmmakers Protesting New Shomron Fund for the ‘Oppression of the Palestinian People’
Elsa Keslassy International Correspondent Ari Folman (“Waltz With Bashir”), Nadav Lapid (“Ahed’s Knee”) and Hagai Levi (“Our Boys”) are among a group of 250 Israeli filmmakers that has signed an open letter to protest against the recently launch of the Shomron (Samaria/West Bank) Film Fund. The Fund, which held its inaugural film festival in the occupied West Bank in July , was founded by Miri Regev, the controversial former culture minister of Israel who was highly criticicized within the local film community for her right-wing views. Regev was believed to have put pressure on the Israel Film Fund to ban films that were critical of Israel from receiving subsidies. The signatories of the public letter said they will not seek funding from, nor cooperate with the Shomron (Samaria/West Bank) Film Fund and have urged the Israeli Academy of Film and Television not to partake in “whitewashing the Occupation” ahead of the Ophir Awards, the country’s version of the Academy Awards, later this month. The filmmakers claim that the Shomron (Samaria) Film Fund has one goal: inviting “Israeli filmmakers to actively participate in whitewashing the Occupation in exchange for financial support and prizes.”
Caroline Framke - Netflix’s ‘Mo’ Brings Laughs and Empathy to a Palestinian Experience TV Rarely Acknowledges: TV Review - variety.com - Texas - Palestine
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Netflix’s ‘Mo’ Brings Laughs and Empathy to a Palestinian Experience TV Rarely Acknowledges: TV Review
Caroline Framke Chief TV Critic At a Texan courthouse, while waiting for his family’s number to be called for a long-awaited hearing, Mo (Mohammed Amer) starts having a sweaty meltdown at precisely the least convenient moment. Fresh off a fight with his girlfriend Maria (Teresa Ruiz), worried sick for his mother, Yusra (Farah Bseiso), and in disbelief that his Palestinian refugee family might actually be getting the asylum they’ve needed for so long, Mo’s so overwhelmed and impatient that he can barely stay in his seat. As with most every episode of “Mo,” Netflix’s new series created by Amer and Ramy Youssef (“Ramy”), the stakes are as high as Mo’s escalating blood pressure.   But “Mo” is also a comedy with a fast-talking lionheart at its center, and as such, even this incredibly stressful time can vibrate with frissons of the ridiculous. Mo tussles with a security guard who refuses to share his water when the vending machine breaks. Yusra, who’s spent years waiting for this day, can’t stop fixating on Mo’s accusation that her giving Maria a cuff bracelet to hide her crucifix tattoo was not, in fact, an entirely altruistic act. Their flighty former lawyer (Cynthia Yelle) smugly parades her current client in front of their new lawyer (Lee Eddy), who’s perfectly competent but immediately loses points for not being Palestinian. Meanwhile, Mo’s brother Sameer (Omar Elba) briefly goes missing to chase an apparently rare finch. Even as they’re all doing their best to keep themselves and their family in one piece, the show keeps finding ways to let Mo and the rest of the Najjar family remain entirely themselves. 
Saudi Arabia set for record-breaking year of executions after mass beheading of 80 - dailystar.co.uk - Jordan - Saudi Arabia - Egypt - Syria - Indonesia - Ethiopia - Palestine
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Saudi Arabia set for record-breaking year of executions after mass beheading of 80
READ MORE Evil killer slaughtered adopted family for inheritance and pinned it on 'berserk' sisterThe European Saudi Organization for Human Rights has hit out at the justice system for failing to cut down on the number of tortures and murders, reports The Mirror. It comes as the group revealed that the killings between January and June demonstrates a shocking 80 per cent increase in executions compared to 2021 - with more than during 2020 and 2021 combined.The ESOHR says the lack of transparency in the system meant that they only learned of the killings after they'd taken place.In its report, the group drew attention to a mass beheading of 81 criminals on March 12 - when more than 70 per cent of the victims were killed for their involvement in non-fatal crimes.Of the total number killed, 41 men - over 50 per cent - were slaughtered for taking part in pro-democracy demonstrations.To justify the killings, the Saudi leadership branded the men "terrorists" before putting them before their executioners.The ESOHR reported that at least three of the men provided credible claims they had been tortured and their confessions forced.Out of 120 sent to die, 101 were Saudi nationals, with the other 19 comprising of nine Yemenis, three Egyptians, two Indonesians and a "citizen from each of Ethiopia, Myannmar, Jordan, Palestine and Syria."The vast majority of them were "tried and executed for punitive crimes" despite promises from the Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to cut down the severity of the sentence for these charges.Forty-one were killed for exercising "basic rights, including participation in demonstrations", the report adds.Another 37 convicts were put to the sword for "unknown" crimes, the report charges, claiming that this
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