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Anonymous Content & CAA Sign Nuhash Humayun, Filmmaker Behind SXSW Grand Jury Award-Winning Horror Short ‘Moshari’

EXCLUSIVE: Anonymous Content and CAA have signed Nuhash Humayun, the Bangladeshi writer-director whose horror short Moshari won the Grand Jury Award at SXSW 2022, for representation.

The original 22-minute horror-fantasy pic was the first film from Bangladesh to premiere in SXSW’s Midnight Shorts Program. It follows sisters Apu (Sunerah Binte Kamal) and Ayra (Nairah Onora Saif), who seek shelter inside archaic mosquito nets—the only way to survive against bloodthirsty monsters—if they can first survive each other. Moshari also this year won the Atlanta Film Festival’s prize for Best Narrative Short.

In addition to SXSW, Humayun’s projects have earned support from Sundance, Film Independent and ScreenCraft. The filmmaker was a ScreenCraft 2022 Film Fund Jury Winner and the first Bangladeshi fellow accepted to the Sundance Screenwriters Intensive. Up next for Humayun as a director is the sci-fi feature Moving Bangladesh, which is currently in pre-production.

“The first time I heard my home mentioned in a film was a throwaway line about there being ‘enough food on this table to feed Bangladesh,'” Humayun told Deadline. “I love infusing genre stories with deeply personal and cultural identity politics. My goal is to portray a Bangladesh/South Asia free from stereotypes and assumptions.

“We have powerful, thrilling, visceral stories to tell. With my incredible team at AC and CAA, I hope to tell intimate personal stories that are also universal,” added the filmmaker. “MOSHARI is revisionist horror/fantasy that inverts the myth of our part of the world as ‘the third world.'”

Anonymous Content is a production and management company that represents a diverse roster of writers, directors, actors and comedians. Recent releases from the

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Bangladesh: Main News

EXCLUSIVE: Anonymous Content and CAA have signed Nuhash Humayun, the Bangladeshi writer-director whose horror short Moshari won the Grand Jury Award at SXSW 2022, for representation.
detonating three nail bombs which tragically killed three people.On April 17, 1999, David Copeland, 45, placed a bomb containing four-inch nails inside a sports bag and left it in Brixton, south London, an area which was known for having a large black community.The bomb was left in the heart of Brixton Market on Electric Avenue, with the aim of causing as many casualties as possible.However, market workers noticed the suspicious package and Copeland acting strangely and decided to move the bag to a less crowded area.The police were later called and the bomb detonated at around 5:30pm, just as the cops arrived on the scene.The explosion injured 48 people, including a one-year-old baby, with extreme right-wing group Combat 18 claiming responsibility.A week later, on April 24, the then-22-year-old detonated a bomb on Brick Lane in east London, an area known for having a large Bangladeshi community.Copeland had aimed to let the bomb off when the street would be most busy but hadn’t realised that the market would take place on Sunday, instead of Saturday.Despite that, he left the device inside a sports bag on Hanbury Street and continued with his original plan.To stay up to date with all the latest news, make sure you sign up to one of our newsletters here.A man noticed the bag and put it in the boot of his car and drove it to a local police station.The bomb exploded while in the car, injuring 13 innocent bystanders.Finally, six days later on April 30, a third bomb went off, this time in Soho, in the heart of London’s gay community. The streets were busy as it was the beginning of a bank holiday weekend and people at the pub had noticed the package, hidden in another sports bag.

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Neo-Nazi tried to start ‘race war’ by detonating three nail bombs killing three people - dailystar.co.uk - county Lane - Bangladesh
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Neo-Nazi tried to start ‘race war’ by detonating three nail bombs killing three people
detonating three nail bombs which tragically killed three people.On April 17, 1999, David Copeland, 45, placed a bomb containing four-inch nails inside a sports bag and left it in Brixton, south London, an area which was known for having a large black community.The bomb was left in the heart of Brixton Market on Electric Avenue, with the aim of causing as many casualties as possible.However, market workers noticed the suspicious package and Copeland acting strangely and decided to move the bag to a less crowded area.The police were later called and the bomb detonated at around 5:30pm, just as the cops arrived on the scene.The explosion injured 48 people, including a one-year-old baby, with extreme right-wing group Combat 18 claiming responsibility.A week later, on April 24, the then-22-year-old detonated a bomb on Brick Lane in east London, an area known for having a large Bangladeshi community.Copeland had aimed to let the bomb off when the street would be most busy but hadn’t realised that the market would take place on Sunday, instead of Saturday.Despite that, he left the device inside a sports bag on Hanbury Street and continued with his original plan.To stay up to date with all the latest news, make sure you sign up to one of our newsletters here.A man noticed the bag and put it in the boot of his car and drove it to a local police station.The bomb exploded while in the car, injuring 13 innocent bystanders.Finally, six days later on April 30, a third bomb went off, this time in Soho, in the heart of London’s gay community. The streets were busy as it was the beginning of a bank holiday weekend and people at the pub had noticed the package, hidden in another sports bag.
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